Mudder’s Milk

” [Zhe shi shen me lan dong xi!?] ~ “What is this garbage!?” – Hoburn Wash
“Mudder’s Milk –  All the protein, vitamins and carbs of your grandma’s best turkey dinner, plus 15% alcohol.” – Jayne Cobb
“It’s horrific!” – Hoburn Wash

A long time ago in a television show that got quickly canceled there appeared a fandom.  Firefly’s bare half season and 1 movie have sparked a joyful cult following well in excess of the actual weight of its’ actual run.  If you’re not a fan I highly recommend it as a series, it’s not a long watch binge wise and rewards re-watching extensively.

In episode 6 titled “Jaynestown” the crew enters a bar on a moon full of indentured workers.  The drink of choice is called Mudder’s Milk and is as referenced above, both nourishing and foul.  Fans have proceeded to attempt to create the drink with everything from pureed tiger bars to meticulously tested oatmeal stout home brew formulas.  During a drunken late night game of Cards against humanity at a convention I was challenged by a ships alchemist to come up with something better since I had spent the majority of the night complaining about all of the bad options around online.

The Challenge was accepted back in 2013 and quickly sparked at least 4-5 months of testing, cooking and drinking.  I think my own personal feeling on the subject was that whatever the resulting drink would be, it had to be drinkable or the entire thing was simply a waste of time.

To start with let me lay out the final recipe.

Per Serving

1/3 Rolled Oatmeal
2/3 cup Water
1/2 Apple
1 Tbsp White Sugar
1 Tbsp Brown Sugar
2 Tsp Ground Cinnamon
2 Tsp Ground Allspice
2 Tsp Ground Nutmeg

1 1/2 oz Irish Cream
1 oz Spiced Rum

Much of the prep for this recipe can be performed in advance.  This is intentional as this is intended for camping as well as breakfast drinking.

Pre-Prep:

Step 1: Using a food processor, blender or spice mill, process rolled oats until they are of a uniform size similar to flour.
Step 2: Place 1 Tsp each of spices and oat flour, into a small container with a lid.
Step 3: Peel, core, and dice apple.
Step 4: Place apples, 1 Tsp of each spice, white sugar, and 1/3 cup of water into a small saucepan over med-low heat.  Simmer for 20-30 mins.
Step 5: Remove apples from heat, allow to cool.
Step 6: Process apples to desired consistency.  This can be done with a stick blender, chinoise, food mill, or strainer and spatula.  Anywhere from chunky to applesauce is fine.
Step 7: Place apple mix in lidded container and refrigerate.

Plating:

 

Step 1: Place oatmeal/spice mix into container with 1/3 cup water.  Allow to soak overnight in the refrigerator or ice chest.
Step 2: Open oatmeal, drain off any remaining water.
Step 3: Add brown sugar and 1-2 Tbspn of apple mixture and stir well.
Step 4: Spoon Apple/oatmeal mix into a glass
Step 5: Add Irish Cream and Rum to glass, stir thoroughly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A lot of trial and error went into the creation of this drink.  I attempted to use everything from heavy cream to apple butter during this process.  As I said above the total research and testing took the better part of 4 months to complete but the results are excellent.  I encourage you to check my previous posts on the subject if you’re curious at all about the process.

Mudder’s Milk: Part the First

Mudder’s Milk 2: The Worthier Part

Mudder’s Milk 3: I Call Her Vera

Mudder’s Milk 4: Coming to a Middle

Mudder’s Milk 5: Big Damn Heroes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. Germain Elderflower Liqueur

stgermainOne of the flavors that I most associate with springtime is the scent of elderflower.  Growing up in the high desert of New Mexico there was a time after a strong sudden rain when the morning glory that laced our little hilltop would open and wash the normally dry air with their scents.  It is one of the few times I can remember the desert smelling like anything other than sand.

St. Germain Elderflower Liqueur has some of that same clean fresh scent and a delicate flavor like little petals and new grasses.

The full 750ml bottle of this liqueur is huge, with giant fluted sides like a vase.  I have tried to make myself buy one in this size a number of times but my shelf sends me angry texts,  “Really?  SRSLY?” and I have to put it back in favor of the 375 or a couple of the 50ml size.  All of their bottles have the same style to them which makes the little 50’s quite cute and perfect for a little rosewater or lavender oil when you’re done.  Prices in oregon run about $4.50 for the 50ml, $19.95 for the 375 and 39.95 for the 750ml.  Seeing as you need only use this one sparingly the bottle will last for quite a while.

St. Germain is a 20% ABV which puts it nicely below a lot of other mixers and keeps the alcohol flavor down.

As a nice spring cocktail I recommend something simple.

1 oz St. Germain
2 oz vodka
Pineapple chunk garnish

Using extra pineapple juice rim cocktail glass with cane sugar, pour contents into mixing glass.  Stir vigorously over ice.  Strain into rimmed glass and garnish with pineapple on a long pick.

I would use something like a Portland Potato or Ransom’s The Vodka which both have a flavor to them which won’t overshadow the elderflower.

Another good cocktail can be found Here.  Cocktailtube has a great sour, it uses an egg white which might not perfect for everyone but it’s a good drink anyway.

Cafe con Leche Flip

wpid-wp-1421662228526.jpegThe original version of this drink comes via a news story in the New York Times about the health department cracking down on raw eggs used in cocktails.  This specific recipe was inspired by the one served at Pegu Club in New York.

Good dark rums are heavy on the ground so picking one is pretty easy.  If you have one you like use that instead but I used a new Cruzan Blackstrap as I have been looking for a good dark rum for some time and wanted to try it out.

Similarly in Portland coffee liqueurs are a dime a dozen.  You can’t throw a hipster belt buckle without hitting a distillery that makes a coffee liqueur.  A lot of it comes down to base spirit and the roaster they’re using but anything from the Below deck Coffee Rum to the House Spirits liqueur will work, use what makes you feel good.

Medium cream (30% fat) might be a little hard to find.  I hit three or four stores looking but didn’t see any.  I eventually subbed in normal whipping cream (25% fat) as it was a little lower fat than medium but significantly less than heavy cream (45%+)

 

Recipe:

1 oz Dark Rum
1.5 oz  coffee liqueur
1 oz simple syrup
2 oz medium cream
1 Egg yolk
Fresh grated nutmeg

This one is going to take some doing.  First put your simple syrup and egg yolks in a dry shaker.  Using a whisk or frother you’ll want to whip them really well.  Next add the cream and ice and give them a good shake to combine.  Add your alcohol and give it a final shake with ice, strain into double old fashioned or flute and grate nutmeg over the top.

I used a cheap frother I picked up at the kitchen gadget outlet store and it worked great.  I wanted to replace the ice in this for the second shake but after looking at the results I thought it was more work for not much difference in result.

The flavor on this is delightful, the egg yolk gives the entire drink a solid mouthfeel.  The coffee flavor is primary but the dark rum lets the cream and sweet flow into more subtle hints of molasses.  It’s almost like a whipped dessert and slides gently around the tongue.  The dark rum and coffee flavors favor each other well and give a nice spiciness without a heavy or syrupy taste.

Cup of Awesome Cocktail

cupoawesomeA while back you may recall that I posted my MYO: Porter syrup.  Aside from the original drink posted in the Happy Hour article there wasn’t a lot I could think to do with it, until recently.  A post on Cocktail Wonk about Knee High Stocking Company in Seattle turned me on to this particular cocktail and I cannot recommend it enough.

The drink includes egg whites, something that a lot of people are leery about.  I can say that if you’re using locally grown eggs or pasteurized eggs that you are in no danger from adding egg whites to your drink.

2 oz Gin
1 oz Porter Syrup
1/4 Tsp Fresh Ground Nutmeg
1/8 Tsp Ground Glove
1/8 Tsp Ground Cinnamon
2 dashes angostura bitters
1 Egg White

Crack the egg and pour the white into a cocktail shaker, using a small whisk or drink frother whisk the egg white until it is fluffy.  Add everything except nutmeg and shake well with ice, strain into cocktail glass, grate nugmeg over the top

Alternately when making your porter syrup you could add the spices at the same time as the sugar yielding a much more flavorful result and giving you a better chance to combine them before they get to your shaker.

The flavors on this are amazing.  I’ve tried it with and without the clove/cinnamon addition and I think either is a great way to go.  The porter converts the juniper into almost a minty flavor and the aromatics from the nutmeg get you started right off the bat.

The drink also looks fantastic, the dark liquid under a nice thick tan foam.  I encourage you to at least give this one a try.

The Gibson

gibsonI sometimes wonder why every single variation in a cocktail requires an alternate naming scheme.  In this case you have a fairly simple drink, gin and vermouth.  One would think that these would be the determining factors, but no.  In this case it is the garnish which determines the name.  If you place a cocktail olive in the drink you have a martini, if instead you place an onion in the drink it becomes known as a Gibson.

Like many cocktails the Gibson’s creation is shrouded in mystery.  It is entirely possible that the drink originated in many places at the same time as the components are not rare, difficult to combine or unusual.  Regardless of the circumstances of its creation the drink is similar to the martini in all respects except for the item on the end of the toothpick.

Even further removed if you garnish the drink with an olive, an onion and another olive alternating on a toothpick the drink is called a Patton.

For those not familiar:

2.5 oz of gin
0.75 oz dry vermouth

Stir over ice, strain into coupe glass.
Garnish with cocktail onions.

You might ask how many, the best advice I’ve ever heard on the subject is as follows:

“Always add between one and three, but remember three is a meal and even numbers are unlucky.  I’ll let you figure the rest out.”

Egg Nogg Creme Anglaise

I made this recipe as part of my experimentation with the Eastside Distilling Holiday Liqueurs.  This one in particular comes from the Egg Nog Liqueur which is usually available through February depending on where you shop.
eggnog custard1 box white cake mix
3 eggs
1 cup Eastside Distilling’s Egg Nog liqueur
1/3 cup sugar


Prepare the cake as directed and allow to cool. Cut cake into 1″ cubes and set aside.  The white cake mix I used called for 3 egg whites which left me with three yolks left over, which is how this whole thing got started in the first place.  If your cake mix calls for whole eggs you might want to adjust accordingly.

If you can’t get Egg Nog Liqueur where you live you can substitute a standard store bought egg nog and 1.5 oz of white rum.

Take egg yolks left over from cake, in a small saucepan whisk egg yolks and sugar. Combine well. Then heat mixture over medium low heat. Slowly add egg nog, mixing and stirring constantly to avoid burning. When all elements have been combined simmer on low for 1-2 minutes. Do not allow to boil.

Allow mixture to cool slightly and thicken.

I’ve covered the whipped topping before HERE but will repeat for clarity.

Coconut Whipped Cream Topping:
1 can full fat coconut milk
1/2 cup powdered sugar
2 tablespoons Eastside Distilling holiday spice liqueur

Chill can of coconut milk overnight to allow water to settle. Scoop white cream out and leave water in the bottom. Should net about 9/10th of a can. In a medium bowl, whisk coconut cream, sugar and liqueur until the sugar is fully combined. Do not over whip.

The cream will not be very stiff but should hold some shape while chilled. Serve In a parfait or dessert cup place 5-6 cake cubes, cover with egg nog custard, top with coconut whipped cream, and then die of ecstasy.

Peppermint Bark Pudding Shots

All Bark no bite!

pepperbark1 cup milk
1 cup Eastside Distilling peppermint bark liqueur
1 4 serving package chocolate pudding mix (instant)
1 8oz container of cool whip
1 candy cane (Peppermint if you dare)

In a large bowl whisk pudding mix, milk and liqueur until blended.
Fold in cool whip.
Pour into shot glasses or plastic serving cups, chill.
Place candy cane in a zip top bag, smack with hammer, yule log or bang on counter to startle reindeer.  Sprinkle pieces on top of shots.

Makes ~15 servings.

Holiday Spice Coconut Whipped Cream

coconut whippedWhen my girlfriend went vegan several months ago it became a challenge to make some of our everyday things.   Other more unusual things have often taken their places.  For instance I have found several recipes for strawberry shortcake that are entirely vegan right down to the whipped cream.  This is the version I have been using currently.  I thank my father for inspiration, he used to whip cherry brandy into his thanksgiving deserts and it inspired me to crack open my holiday spice liqueur and give this a try.

1 can full fat coconut milk
1/2 cup powdered sugar
2 tablespoons Eastside Distilling holiday spice liqueur

Chill can of coconut milk overnight to allow water to settle. Scoop white cream out and leave water in the bottom. Should net about 9/10th of a can. In a medium bowl, whisk coconut cream, sugar and liqueur until the sugar is fully combined. Do not over whip.

The cream will not be very stiff but should hold some shape while chilled.

Works well over macerated fruit, cake, ice cream, pie or as an additive to coffee and hot chocolate.

Derailer Cocktail

derailerCredit for this drink goes directly to Podnah’s Pit where it was created and where I and the Hop Boxer found it.

First of the basic recipe.

1.5 oz Jameson Irish Whiskey
1 oz Creme de Cassis
0.5 oz Lime Juice
4 oz Ginger Beer

As presented you want to put your lime, jameson and cassis in your shaker, strain into your highball or collins glass and then top with ginger beer.

Not terribly complicated, it follows the standard 2/1/1 format for most “classic” cocktails.

This drink comes into the category of Buck Cocktails or Mules which are really just spirit + citrus + ginger beer.

I’ve gone over some Options for what to use as your ginger beer selection.

There are any number of fine bottled options, find one that has the amount of bite you enjoy and stick with it.  I’m fine with Cock n’ Bull but if Bundaberg is around in the store I’ll snag a 4 pack of that as it’s a nice midpoint between Cock n’ Bull and Reeds.

If you want to use Ginger Syrup I have found that a dilution of about 4 to 1 is pretty standard so 1 oz syrup to 4 oz club soda.  You can play with that if you want but it comes out pretty strong otherwise and you don’t really want the sugar in the syrup to overshadow the cassis.

Some notes about the drink itself:

I don’t personally think that the brand of whiskey involved makes much of a difference here but I think type plays a role.  Jameson is an Irish Whiskey which is going to be very different in flavor profile than say a Bourbon or a Tennessee Whiskey like Jack Daniels.  Scotch is wasted in this drink so don’t bother with anything there.  I think part of the draw on Jameson is that it lacks many of the smokey characteristics of some other whiskey and is smooth enough to work well in the drink.   Additionally it’s one of the few Irish whiskey’s you’re likely to find in a smaller bar.

For those not familiar with Creme de Cassis it is a liqueur flavored with black currants.  This is a fruit not many people have any experience with as they haven’t been actively cultivated in the US for several decades.  Their commercial cultivation was banned in the 1900’s and that ban has only slowly been lifted by a few US states, Oregon among them.  So the liqueur is a bit more common in Europe and is generally imported.  Locally Clear Creek makes a very lovely Cassis Liqueur which runs about $22.50 for a 375ml.  I’ve seen them in a number of liquor stores around the area so they aren’t hard to find they’re just not always in the same spot as the Creme de Cassis which you can generally find in fifths for $9-13.  The major differences in the two are usually sweetness and tartness.  The price on clear creek’s Cassis is higher but it is worth it for having a non-artificial taste and a very natural tartness.

One last deviation from the norm, I concocted a version I call the light-railer which swaps the Jameson and Cassis for Eastside Distilling Marionberry Whiskey.  It loses a bit of the tartness but the flavor profile of Eastside’s whiskey stands up a bit better in the cocktail and you get a much clearer whiskey flavor without a lot of extra oak barrel getting into the drink.

Update: Rhulman’s Paloma

Issa PalomaThe previous article about this drink can be found here.

After a bit of hunting I finally found a couple of local places where I could find Izze Sparkling Juice on a regular basis.

I can see why they are useful in this context.  They are unsweetened and are about 70% juice and 30% soda water.

If you wanted to do something similar a bottle of ruby red grapefruit and a splash of club soda would be pretty equivalent.

Using it here was a good, I used the same amounts as the original simply replacing the squirt with Izze.  It still needed a dash of agave syrup to round the whole thing out.  Without it they were bitter and sour without being tart.